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Q: Can I use It’s A Trap! if someone uses Zap A Card to take one of my Keepers into their hand?

A: Quick answer: Yes.

Obviously, the more generic Belay That! (counter Action) would work, but the question here is about whether Zapping would trigger the Trap. The card It’s A Trap! is intended to counter Keeper “stealing” in all general senses to include more than just the specific Action Steal A Keeper. It was originally conceived to counter Keepers with special stealing abilities, like The Captain or The Scientist in Star Fluxx, but it also works if someone is invoking Crime Happens (AKA Plunder) to steal one of your Keepers.

So, since Zap A Card essentially lets someone steal one of your Keepers, we would answer yes: you can use It’s A Trap in response to someone Zapping one of your Keepers into their hand. Of course, if they don’t have any Keepers in play themselves, you won’t get anything back, but you will still squander their Zap A Card, and prevent your Keeper from being taken.

Note that You Can’t Take This Guy From Me (Firefly Fluxx) has the same trigger, and can be invoked by all the same situations. Although there is no Zap A Card in Firefly Fluxx, there is a Plunder card, and Zap A Card is available as a promo, so it could be added to any deck.

Q: What happens if I Zap a Creeper attached to a Keeper? Or Zap a Keeper with a Creeper attached?

A: The Creeper and Keeper stay attached together until something separates them. So they would go to you, and attempt to go into your hand, which would separate them, since a Creeper cannot be held in your hand. So you’d end up with the Keeper in your hand, and the Creeper on the table in front of you, which will immediately attach to a Keeper, if possible (some can attach to any Keeper, some only to certain types.)

Q: When I use Zap A Card on a Creeper, do I get to put it in my hand, then play it and draw to replace it?

A: Not quite. If you Zap a Creeper, you would simply then place it in front of you. You don’t get to draw anything.

The reason the Creeper card includes the words “then draw to replace” is that if you draw a Creeper, it goes down in front of you, and that doesn’t count as one of your draws (or one of your plays) so you still have a draw left, which you get to execute. Or if you were dealt a Creeper at the beginning of the game, it needs to go down in front of you, and you need to replace the card missing from your initial hand, since you should not start the game with a smaller hand than everyone else.

If you gain a Creeper any other way, you just gain it. It cannot ever really go into your hand, so it goes directly into play. If you choose to Zap a Creeper, you just get that Creeper. The reason is that Zap isn’t meant to give you an extra card in your hand so much as it is meant to give you whatever card you Zapped. So it’s not like you somehow missed out on the card Zap was intended to give you, such that you need to draw to “replace” anything.

Q: When using the Fluxx card Zap A Card as the repeating action with the Rule Let’s Keep Doing that, what happens if you zap Zap A Card?

A: The answer is that when you pick an Action card to go onto Let’s Keep Doing that, it’s like they become grafted together, so you can’t do anything to one without affecting the other. In this case the Action is really just a reminder, sort of a “shadow card” that indicates the current power of Let’s Keep Doing that, which is the Rule which is actually in play, and the Action is not considered to really be “in play”.

So we would rule that you can’t actually zap Zap A Card, you could only zap Let’s Keep Doing That. When you zap Let’s Keep Doing That, the applicable Action would go in the discard pile, and, as per the Zap A Card instructions, the Rule would go into your hand.

Q: When using Zap A Card in Fluxx, can I take cards out of the discard pile?

A: No. The card says you can take any card “in play” on the table. That includes: the current Goal, any current Rule (not the Basic Rules, of course), or any Keeper or Creeper in front of any player. Note, of course, that Creepers cannot be held in your hand, so they go back into play in front of you if you steal them from someone else, instead of going into your hand.

Q: When playing Zap A Card or Move a Card in Aquarius or Seven Dragons, do the remaining cards need to be still touching?

A: Creating separated groups of cards via Zap or Move is not specifically disallowed, as long as you can tell the grid relationship of the gap created, so you know where to place any connecting cards.

Since the groups might later be reconnected, it needs to be clear where they are with respect to future cards that might reconnect them to the larger layout. Theoretically, if you wanted to create a “board” that showed your grid to the corners of the table, you could create gaps of any distance.

Most people aren’t going to create a grid “board” to play on, however. A general guideline would be, assuming you can keep your cards relatively tidy on the table, we recommend leaving a gap of no more than one card between groups. That said, if you think your gaming group can keep things straight, you could leave a bigger gap if you want to.

Keep in mind that when you replay a card into the gap, as with any play to the table, it only needs to connect panels on one side. There is no requirement that you form a valid elemental connection on more than one side.

Q: When Zapping A Card in Aquarius, are you allowed to create an “island”: an isolated card not attached to the rest?

A: It is fine to create an “island.” Furthermore, when playing a card reconnecting the island to the rest of the cards, the card you play still only has to have a match on one side, just as usual (so it can connect to the “island,” or the “mainland,” and is not required to match both). Of course, connecting more than one way may still have its advantages, it’s just not required.