Adventure Time™ Fluxx FAQ

Also be sure to check out All Fluxx FAQ for more general questions. If you don’t see your question answered among these, please email us at:
FAQ@looneylabs.com

Q: If I play Draw 3, Play 2 of Them, and one of the cards I draw is Let’s Keep Doing That, is Draw 3 Play 2 of them available to “Keep Doing”? What about the unused third card?

A: The first answer is very easy: No. D3P2 does not technically go in the discard pile until you are completely done executing everything on the card.

You also seem to be asking whether the card you don’t play from D3P2 is in the discard pile, available to pull out and use with Let’s Keep Doing That.

Technically, you should execute the instructions on D3P2 in the order stated: Play 2 of them, and [then] discard the last card.

So you play D3P2. It’s not technically in the discard pile yet. Then you play, from your mini-hand of 3 cards, Let’s Keep Doing That. Nothing in your mini-hand is in the discard pile yet. You must pick your Action out of the discard pile right then, as part of your play of Let’s Keep Doing that, so, no, the last card from the D3P2 is not yet in the discard pile, available for use with Let’s Keep Doing that. It will be after you’re done playing both of the cards you choose to play, and not before.

Back To Top

Q: Do Keepers fighting in The Arena come from your hand, or from in play in front of you?

A: The Keepers offered up for combat have to already be in play in front of you. If there are not enough combatants (only one person has a Keeper in play) that entity simply wins by default. They stick their head in the Arena, see that there’s nobody there trying to kill them, breathe a sigh of relief, and get the heck out of there.

When in doubt, the general rule with things applying to Keepers is that the Keeper has to be in play in order to be able to “do things”. Usually that means using special powers, but in this case, it also means being obligated to fight in the Arena.

Back To Top

Q: How do Creepers and Marceline interact with the Ancient Psychic Tandem War Elephant promo?

We were playing with this deck tonight and I used the bonus card Ancient Psychic Tandem War Elephant (APTWE). The APTWE says “If any two players each have a Keeper needed to win by the current Goal, the game ends with both players being the winners. If not, draw 2 cards.” I had one Keeper for the Goal and my wife had the other Keeper, along with the Marceline Keeper that says “Creepers do not prevent you from winning.” We both had Creepers in front of us.

I said we both won as Marceline negates the Creepers played. My son says only my wife did because she had the card and it only applies to her.

A: Well, we debated for quite a while about this. We could see either of these arguments making sense, but in the end, we came to the same conclusion you did (you both win because Marceline negates Creepers). Keep in mind, however, that if Marceline was not in play, and only one of you had a Creeper, neither of you would win. It’s all or nothing with the APTWE.

The way we see it is that the two players are essentially merging into one, à la the two-headed elephant of the card title. So their Keeper set merges, and so do their Creepers. So, for example, if only one player had a Creeper, and the other one didn’t, their sets would be psychically merged, and it would be as if they were one two-headed player… who had a Creeper preventing the win. So one player’s Creeper would prevent both people from winning.

However, the same is true of Marceline’s power: when the players Keeper/Creeper sets merge, her power now extends to both people, so she neutralizes Creepers for the joined set which can then win, no matter who originally had Creepers.

Back To Top

Q: The Enchiridion allows me to look at the top three cards of the discard pile. What if one or more is a Creeper?

…The Enchiridion card says “Look at the top 3 cards in the deck, add 1 to your hand, discard 1, and put the remainder back on top.” I wasn’t actually drawing the cards, so we played it no differently for Creepers than any other card, but I wasn’t so sure about how to play this one.

A: We would agree that you are simply LOOKING at the cards, not drawing them, so you have no obligation to take the Creeper (unless that’s the card you want).

Back To Top

Q: If I have the Computer (which lets me ignore limits) and someone takes him away or trashes him, do I then have to comply with the current limits?

A: Yup. The same would apply if you have the Batcomputer, or BMO which allow you to exceed the current limits by 1 (or “one” depending on how the card is worded).

The Computer exists both as a regular card in Star Fluxx, and as a promo card available to put in any Fluxx version (though they’re worded ever so slightly differently).

Back To Top

Q: If the card I draw because of James Baxter is a Creeper, does the Creeper-elimination happen before or after I have to put that card into play??

A: You execute those things listed in the order shown, so Creeper elimination happens after drawing an extra card. James Baxter just makes everyone feel good. So if you draw a Creeper because of James Baxter, put it into play, and then draw to replace it. Then, after all that, the Creeper discard phase occurs.

So if a problem shows up while James Baxter is around, he gets rid of it for you, along with any other problems!* He’s just great.

* After getting rid of all Creepers in play, James Baxter then gets rid of all Hand and Keeper Limits in play.

Back To Top

Q: Can I win with Citizens of the Candy Kingdom if I have Candy Zombies, if they’re my only Creeper?

A: Yes. Though the Goal does not call out Candy Zombies specifically, they are clearly marked Candy People, and, as long as they’re your ONLY Creeper, that’s enough to count as “unless the Goal says otherwise” (regarding them preventing a win).

Thematically, Princess Bubblegum certainly still cares about them and would consider them citizens of her kingdom, even though they are afflicted with the zombie sickness.

Back To Top

Q: What happens if I play Let’s Keep Doing That, and there are no Actions in the discard pile?

A: Sometimes when you play something, it has no effect, and is simply discarded when played. This is one of those times.

Usually this only happens with Actions, but Let’s Keep Doing That is quite different from other New Rules, so it ends up being discarded under these circumstances.

Back To Top

Q: What happens if I have zero cards in hand, with draw 1, play 1, and I draw and play Play All But 1?

A: The card Play All But 1 says: Play all but 1 of your cards. If you started with no cards in your hand and only drew 1*, draw an extra card.

So, the player in question, starting with zero cards, must play the card they draw. If that card turns out to be Play All But 1, then, as per the directions on that card, since they “started with no cards in [their] hand and only drew 1” then they need to draw an extra card. Since the current Rule is Play All But 1, they are left with 1 card in their hand, and their turn is over.

*Note that in some printings, this second instance is written out, but, to avoid conflicts with Inflation, it should actually be a numeral as written here.

Back To Top

Q: What happens if I play an Action that causes my turn to end immediately in the middle of Draw 3 Play 2 or Draw 2 & Use Em?

…Since these cards are all played as part of a single play, would the player get to finish playing them out, or would their turn just stop? And if it just stopped, what would happen to any unplayed cards? We’ve been letting the player keep them.

A: The clear answer is that if you decide to play one of these turn-ending Actions first, of course your turn would end immediately, as you have been playing it.

However, there is NO way that any remaining cards would go back into your set-aside hand. They are never intended to go into your actual hand at all, as indicated by the requirement to set your hand aside. Any cards left unplayed when you played the turn-ending card are discarded. If you wanted to play them, you should have done it before the turn-ending card.

Brain Transference: Discard remaining cards in your temporary hand and trade places with the player of your choice. Turn ends.
Time Portal: Choose a card as described and add to your set-aside hand. Discard remaining cards in your temporary hand. Turn ends.
What Do You Want: If you choose to take a Keeper or Goal out of the discard, it goes into your set aside hand. Discard remaining cards in your temporary hand. Turn ends.
I’ll Be In My Bunk: This card does not specifically say that your turn ends immediately, but you certainly can’t continue your turn if you “Excuse yourself from the game and leave the room for a few minutes.” Discard any cards remaining in your temporary hand. Leave the room.

Swap Plays For Draws and Get On With It, while they do involve having your turn end immediately, are New Rules, not Actions, so, as you can see from this answer, things would work a bit differently:
See: Can you Get On With It or Swap Plays For Draws with your cards from an Action like Draw 3 Play 2?

Back To Top

Q: Do you get to change out the Action placed on Let’s Keep Doing That on every turn?

…or are you supposed to choose one Action card when you put the Rule into play and then that Action stays assigned?

A: The latter. The Action you place on Let’s Keep Doing That does not go away. Whoever plays that Rule gets to decide what the one Action is that everybody has the opportunity to use once on their turn.

Back To Top

Q: Does countering a Surprise on my turn count as one of my plays? Can I also use it for the in-turn function if I do this?

A: If you are the active player, counter-Surprising does not use up one of your total plays for the turn. By the same token, however, this means you cannot use the Surprise for it’s function which would use a play. To wit:

You can only use a Surprise to do one of three things:

1) use it on your turn as a play, for it’s in-turn function
OR
2) Use it to Surprise another player,
2a) on another player’s turn to cancel a play
OR
2b) on your turn to counter their interruption of your own play (“counter-Surprise”)

You cannot do more than one of those things.

So if you’re using it to counter-Surprise on your turn (2b), you can’t also use it as one of your plays for it’s “in-turn” function (1).

Back To Top

Q: Can I use Get On With It if I played my only card, but the Play rule says to play more? Does that count as “before my final play”?

…I had one card in my hand, with Play 4 in effect. I played my card, an Action card which was then discarded. I wanted to claim to able to get 3 new cards because “Get On With It” which was on the table says I could since I had discarded my hand and had 4 – 1 = 3 plays left.

A: In order to take the option to Get On With It, you must be sacrificing (at least) one of your Plays, and you must be discarding a hand of at least one card.

The most obvious issue is that, at the point when you wanted to Get On With It, you didn’t discard your hand. You played an Action, and now your hand is empty. You have to have something to discard in order to discard something. Your hand has to exist in order to be discarded.

The second issue is almost a side effect. We would not consider you to “have plays left” if you have no cards to play. In this case your first play WAS your final play, so you can’t take this option because it’s not before your final play. In order to have a final play, you have to have a card to play.

The whole thing follows logically, since the card/s you could have played – but didn’t – will be remaining in your hand, and therefore among the cards you’re throwing away.

See also: Is Swap Plays For Draws limited by the number of cards you have in your hand?

Back To Top

Q: Why does Let’s Do That Again say we shouldn’t change the order of the discard pile?

…It seems like it wouldn’t really matter.

A: Actually, this is mostly unnecessary. There used to be a rule where one could take things out of the top three cards, but that card has been replaced in all current versions with this one, which is more liberal. That said, there is a promo card which allows you to take the bottom card off the discard pile, so it would matter if you were playing with the promo card Composting. Hmm.

In EcoFluxx, the Action Scavenger lets you look down through the discard pile and play the first Keeper you find. Anyhow, you could look at the other cards in your deck, and see if this is going to matter for the version you’re playing with. It’s a matter of logic.

Back To Top

Q: Can a Keeper exchange (with Exchange Keepers) be stopped with the Surprise That’s Mine?

A: No. Exchanging a Keeper is not the same as playing it. The Exchange Keepers Action could be stopped with the Surprise Avast (Halt! Stop That) but not with That’s Mine!

Back To Top

Q: When we draw a Creeper, put it into play, and then “draw another card to replace it,” does that card replace the Creeper, discarding it?

A: It’s true, the Creeper card does say “immediately draw another card to replace it” but this doesn’t mean you replace the Creeper on the table, discarding it. This means “replace the Creeper in the number of cards you drew.” If you needed to draw 3 cards, and you drew them and one of them was a Creeper, you play the Creeper and draw another card, because that Creeper doesn’t count as one of the 3 cards you needed to draw (neither does it count against the number of cards you get to Play on your turn), so you have only drawn 2 cards, so you still need to draw a third.

You’re not replacing the Creeper from it’s place “in play” (i.e. on the table). You’re just replacing the card “lost” as part of your draw count because it was a Creeper. The idea is that Creepers go into play automatically, whether you want them to or not. They’re usually a problem for you, and you have to work to get rid of them (though sometimes you need them for Goals, otherwise, they hinder you).

Back To Top

Q: What cards have effects that include ending my turn immediately if I play/use them?

A: Cards (Actions) that end your turn immediately if you play them:

Brain Transference: Star Fluxx
Time Portal: Star Fluxx
What Do You Want: Star Fluxx, Oz Fluxx, Doctor Who Fluxx
I’ll Be In My Bunk: Firefly Fluxx (This card does not specifically say that your turn ends immediately, but you certainly can’t continue your turn if you “Excuse yourself from the game and leave the room for a few minutes.”)

Cards (Rules) that end your turn immediately if you choose to utilize their ability:

Swap Plays for Draws
Get On With it

(Since “free” Rule-based actions are optional, the player is not obligated to use their power, so simply putting them into play does not end the players turn immediately. However if any player chooses to use the powers of these cards, the effect concludes with their turn ending immediately.)

Back To Top

Q: Can the Stop That! Surprise counter the “free action” provided by some Rules or Keepers?

A: Those are not considered “Actions” in the sense that they are not Action cards, and Stop That (or Belay That) is intended to cancel out Action cards specifically. Nor will Veto! which cancels Rules stop this type of free action.

More broadly worded Surprises might prevent some of these, however. For example, Skullduggery is designed so that it can prevent Plundering (among other things), which is a “free action” on a Rule. It’s A Trap and You Can’t Take This Guy From Me are designed so that they can prevent special Keeper actions that let someone steal one of your Keepers.

There might be some confusion on Let’s Keep Doing That, since there is an Action card permanently in play, but it is intended to act as if it were a New Rule, so we would rule that it’s no longer stoppable by the Stop That! Anti-Action Surprise.

Back To Top

Q: When a Goal asks for a Keeper and “any Creeper” or “a Creeper” such as Unacceptable and I’ll Save You, are you allowed to have only one Creeper, or does this goal allow you to win regardless of having multiple Creepers?

A: If a Goal requires any Creeper, then it’s fine to have more than one Creeper. The idea here is that problems are needed, so extra problems are not a problem.

Back To Top

Q: Can a Surprise be used to cancel a Hand Limit on your own turn?

…Example:
Player A plays a Hand Limit
Player B and C discard down to the hand limit
Player A plays Veto to cancel the Hand Limit for themselves.

Is this allowed?

A: Well, it all depends how Player A was trying to play the Veto. Every Surprise has two different instructions on it. One for when you’re using it to interrupt someone else’s play, and one for if you play it out of your own hand as a regular card on your turn.

First case (the out-of-turn function):

If Player A was trying to use the out-of-turn function to cancel the play of their own card, that’s not allowed. It’s their turn, so they can only use the in-turn function. See also: Can one ever use the out-of-turn function of a Surprise on their own turn?

Note that even if it were another person playing out-of-turn to cancel the card (let’s call them Player D) the Surprise should be played immediately after the card one wants to cancel: in the case of a Hand Limit, that would ideally be before anyone has discarded anything.

Moreover, even if everyone decided to cut imaginary Player D some slack about the timing, and they did let Player D play the Veto after some people had discarded, canceling the Rule would “prevent it from ever taking effect” and everyone would get to take all their cards back as though the Hand Limit had never been played. Long story short: you can’t Veto a rule just for you. The Rule applies to everyone, so when you Veto it, it’s Vetoed for everyone.

Second case (the in-turn function):

If Player A still had a play left on their turn after playing the Hand Limit, they could simply play the Veto for its in-turn function. What it does in this case is let them “discard [their] choice of up to 2 New Rules currently in play”. The Rules discarded don’t even have to be ones that were recently played.

In this case, those rules are not being “canceled” without ever having taken effect, they’re just being discarded. The Rules were played, they took effect for as long as they were in play, and then they were discarded. So if Player A did that, they could simply trash the Hand Limit before their turn ends, thereby avoiding having to discard down at all. Of course, this uses up one of their plays for their turn.

Back To Top

Q: If someone plays Trade Hands with me, and I have some Surprises (other than Stop That, which could prevent the trade) can I use them even though they’re not canceling a card play, just so I don’t have to give them to the other player?

A: No. Surprises can only be played for an out-of-turn effect when there is an effect to be had. You can’t just play a Surprise for no effect just to burn it.

When used for their in-turn effect, of course, they behave much the same way as Actions, and, as such, may or may not have an effect.

Back To Top

Q: Can I play a Surprise to cancel a win caused by using Wormhole?

A: While using the Wormhole Rule (or any of it’s analogues) is not affected by Surprises, the card that is drawn and played because of Wormhole IS affected by them. So if the card drawn from Wormhole that caused the win was a Goal, then Canceled Plans would be able to prevent the win, since it cancels Goals. If the card played was a Keeper, you’d need to use the That’s Mine in order to stop the win.

Of course, you can’t cancel it if YOU are the one who is using Wormhole.
See Can one ever use the “out-of-turn” function of a Surprise during one’s own turn?

Analogues of Wormhole (found in Star Fluxx) include (some with slight variations such as conditional requirements for use):
Magic Shoes in Oz Fluxx
Egads! in Batman Fluxx
Magic Portal in Adventure Time Fluxx
Shiny! in Firefly Fluxx

the following have a Wormhole analogue, but do not have Surprises naturally occurring in the deck:
Mystery Play in Fluxx 5.0 and SE
Time Doorway in Regular Show Fluxx
Open The Door in Monster Fluxx
Chemical X in Cartoon Network Fluxx
Great Idea! in Stoner Fluxx

Back To Top

Q: If multiple Surprises are canceled by each other, how do you figure out what happens in the end?

Example:
Player A uses That’s Mine for its in-turn function to steal a Keeper from Player B
Player B uses It’s A Trap! to cancel the steal, and instead steal from Player A
Player A uses Canceled plans to cancel It’s A Trap, since Surprises can cancel Surprises.

Does the original steal go through? Player B argued that there was no steal in either direction, as both That’s Mine and It’s A Trap had been canceled by subsequent Surprises.

A: The short answer is that That’s Mine is carried out for it’s in-turn function for the Keeper steal.

The long answer:

  • That’s Mine is played in turn: Keeper is stolen
  • It’s A Trap is played out of turn by victim: That’s Mine is negated and the Keeper steal is reversed
  • Cancelled plans negates It’s a Trap, which had previously been reversing the Keeper steal and negating That’s Mine. This leaves That’s Mine un-negated to steal the Keeper as originally played

It’s not that cards just get put on the discard pile, covered and they’re gone. Think of each card as going into a “being played” area only into the discard pile when they are done being used, or when negated for good. There was sort of a little wrestling match out there in the “being played” area between all the Surprises, and It’s A Trap lost.

Here is a generic version of what a battle like this could look like. It can continue until you run out of Surprises. Keep in mind that it’s totally possible and allowed for some other player, for example, Player C, to jump in on either side, potentially confusing the toggle state of the original play. If things come to this, it may be very important to keep track of the original play being canceled, perhaps putting it in the middle and flipping it over to indicate which state it is in: effective, vs canceled.

  • A plays some card X.
  • B plays Surprise 1, canceling X.
  • A cancels surprise 1 with Surprise 2, so X is in effect again.
  • B cancels surprise 2 with Surprise 3, so Surprise 1 goes through, and X is canceled again.

and so forth. If there were more, it would look like this:

  • A cancels surprise 3 with Surprise 4, so Surprise 2 goes through, canceling Surprise 1, so X happens.
  • B cancels surprise 4 with Surprise 5, so Surprise 3 goes through, canceling Surprise 2, so Surprise 1 is in effect again, so X is canceled.

So far, the maximum number of Surprises in a version is 6, in Batman Fluxx, but here’s the page where we would update that info:
Complexity Factors for Fluxx editions

Back To Top

Q: When using the Fluxx card Zap A Card as the repeating action with the Rule Let’s Keep Doing that, what happens if you zap Zap A Card?

A: The answer is that when you pick an Action card to go onto Let’s Keep Doing that, it’s like they become grafted together, so you can’t do anything to one without affecting the other. In this case the Action is really just a reminder, sort of a “shadow card” that indicates the current power of Let’s Keep Doing that, which is the Rule which is actually in play, and the Action is not considered to really be “in play”.

So we would rule that you can’t actually zap Zap A Card, you could only zap Let’s Keep Doing That. When you zap Let’s Keep Doing That, the applicable Action would go in the discard pile, and, as per the Zap A Card instructions, the Rule would go into your hand.

Back To Top

Q: Play All but 1 seems broken with Inflation.

…As written on my deck, Play All But 1 reads “Play all but 1 of your cards. If you started with no cards in your hand and only drew one, draw
an extra card.” This means that if my Draw 1 was Inflated to Draw 2, then I don’t get to draw the necessary extra card to enable me to have any plays at all on my turn.

A: As you may have noted, the fix for this is simple, which is to treat the second “one” as a “1”, which it should have been in the first place. We’ll be implementing this fix on all subsequent printings starting in 2016.

Please treat this card as though it read: “Play all but 1 of your cards. If you started with no cards in your hand and only drew 1, draw an extra card.”

Note that Adventure Time Fluxx has the card Mathematical, which is an analogue of Inflation.
Math Fluxx has Increment All, which is like Inflation, but only applies to Actions and New Rules.

Back To Top

Q: What are all the different cards in different versions where you get to draw the top card and play it immediately?

A: There are many analogues to Wormhole (the first one we made) or Mystery Play (the most generic themed one). Some may require a token action (click your heels together to use Magic Shoes in Oz Fluxx, for example) or condition (if a certain card is in play) to activate them but they are essentially all the same kind of card.

Mystery Play in Fluxx 5.0 and SE
Wormhole in Star Fluxx
Shiny! in Firefly Fluxx
Allons-y/Geronimo! in Doctor Who Fluxx
Spontaneous Reaction in Chemistry Fluxx
Egads! in Batman Fluxx
Unknown Variable in Math Fluxx
Great Idea! in Stoner Fluxx
Magic Portal in Adventure Time Fluxx
Magic Shoes in Oz Fluxx (if you click your heels together three times)
Open The Door in Monster Fluxx (If the Spooky Door is in play)
Open A Gift! in Holiday Fluxx (if The Gift is in play)
Chemical X in Cartoon Network Fluxx (if at least one Powerpuff Girl is in play)
Time Doorway in Regular Show Fluxx (if the Time Machine is in play)

Back To Top

Q: Could you clarify how many cards we can eliminate with Let’s Simplify? What does “up to half (rounded up)” mean?

A: The wording on Let’s Simplify is as clear as we could make it. If we had said that you may discard up to half of the New Rules in play, and there were an odd number (for example, five of them) you wouldn’t know whether you could should round up or down. But we tell you that you should ROUND UP when figuring out what “half” is, so in this example, you know you can discard up to three.

Of course, you may discard up to half – you don’t have to discard three; you could choose to discard just one or two, or even zero if you want. Those numbers are all less than “half (rounded up) of five”.

Back To Top

Q: How does Inflation interact with cards that say you “may” play (or draw 1) extra?

When a card states that you “may” play 1 extra card (e.g., Rich Bonus or Party Bonus), and Inflation is in play, it is treated as you may play 2 extra cards. Does this mean that you have to choose between playing 0 and playing 2, or can you also play only 1?

See this answer in a video!
Little Answers

A: It’s either zero or two. There is no one.

Adventure Time includes the Inflation analogue, Mathematical! Inflation is also available as a promo card to add to any Fluxx deck.

Back To Top

Q: Can you Get On With It or Swap Plays For Draws with your cards from an Action like Draw 3 Play 2?

A: You could certainly put either of these New Rules into play as part of an Action like Draw 3 Play 2 of them (D3P2) or Draw 2 and Use Em (D2UE), but you could not utilize their functions while in the middle of executing one of these Actions. While these Actions do give you a sort of temporary hand, you can’t substitute it for your real hand to “discard and draw back up to 3”, for example.

You would either need to invoke Get On With It! before the D3P2 is played or after. The Playing of D3P2, and all actions as a result of it are all 1 “Play”.

See also: What happens if I play and Action that causes my turn to end immediately in the middle of Draw 3 Play 2 or Draw 2 & Use Em?

Back To Top

Q: If a card says “Your turn ends immediately,” but Play All is in effect, which takes precedence?

A: When you play an Action or use a New Rule card says “your turn ends immediately” it means it’s specifically overriding any Play rule that might otherwise require you to keep playing cards. You also end any option you may have to use Keeper powers or “free” Rule Actions. If it says “your turn ends immediately” then your turn ends immediately – so make sure you’re all done with stuff before you play/use one of these cards!

See: Q: What cards have effects that include ending my turn immediately if I play/use them?

Back To Top

Q: Is the third Surprise function (countering another Surprise) limited to in-turn or out-of-turn play?

A: You can use the counter-Surprise function at any time, either during someone else’s turn or your own. Here are some basic examples:

On your own turn:
Someone cancels one of your plays with a Surprise. You play a Surprise to counter their Surprise. Note: although it is your turn, this does not count as one of your Plays.

On someone else’s turn:
They play a Surprise for the in-turn function. You play a Suprise to counter it.

On someone else’s turn:
They play a card. You cancel it with the appropriate Surprise. They counter-Surprise you. You counter-Surprise them!

On someone else’s turn:
Player A plays a card. Player B cancels it with a Surprise. You decide to counter Player B’s Surprise, for whatever reason motivates you.
(In other words, if there is a Surprise/counter-Surprise “battle” going on between two other players, as described in the previous example, you can jump in at any time on either players “side”.)

Back To Top

Q: Can you use Skullduggery to cancel a Plunder – not on the Rule itself, but on a single act of Plundering?

Or to cancel City Of Thieves in Adventure Time Fluxx, or Crime Happens in Batman Fluxx

A: Yes

Back To Top

Q: If something is played where “your turn ends immediately,” does it mean that you are not subject to the hand and Keeper limits that turn?

A: No. Hand and Keeper Limits apply to you when it’s not your turn, so you would observe them as soon as your turn ends. Similarly, if you receive a card when it’s not your turn, you must observe the hand limit as soon as you get the card.

See: Q: What cards have effects that include ending my turn immediately if I play/use them?

Back To Top

Q: What do I do if I draw a Creeper because of an Action?

for example, Draw 3 Play 2, or Everybody Gets 1?

A: If a Creeper is drawn by the active player during Draw 3, Play 2, or Everybody Gets 1 (or any other similar situation) that active player must take the Creeper (play it in front of themselves) and draw to replace, such that all the cards they have drawn for these purposes will contain no Creepers.

Actions that might cause you to draw a Creeper include:
Discard & Draw
Draw 3, Play 2 of Them
Draw 2 and Use ‘Em
Pandora’s Box
Dreams and Omens
Jackpot
Best Payday Ever!
Today’s Special
My Hovercraft Is Full Of Eels
What Is Your Quote?
Nudge, Nudge, Wink, Wink…
The Golden Cap

Back To Top

Q: If the rules are Draw 1, and I draw three Creepers in a row, how many cards do I redraw?

…I say it’s just one card, but my husband says it should be three, since three Creepers were drawn. Who is right?

A: For practical purposes, you are correct. If you have laid down three Creepers in a row like that, you are left needing to draw 1. After your draw phase, you should end up having drawn just 1 non-Creeper for your Draw 1.

If anyone is having a hard time wrapping their head around why this is, here’s a blow-by-blow description of what happens when you draw three Creepers in a row while trying to Draw 1.

You Draw 1. It’s a Creeper.
It goes in front of you, and you draw to replace it, hoping for a non-Creeper to satisfy the current Draw rule.
Your “draw to replace” is… a second Creeper.
It goes in front of you with the first, and you draw to replace it, hoping for a non-Creeper to satisfy the current Draw rule.
Your “draw to replace” is… a third Creeper.
It goes in front of you, and you draw to replace it, hoping for a non-Creeper to satisfy the current Draw rule.
Your “draw to replace” is… finally a non-Creeper, which you add to your hand, and you have successfully followed the current Draw rule, which is Draw 1.

As you can see, in some ways, your husband is right… but the thing is, the three cards that were “drawn to replace” did happen… they’re just over as soon as you draw 1 non-Creeper.

Back To Top

Q: Do Surprises work any differently in a two-player game than they do in a game with more people?

A: There is no reason Surprises would work any differently depending on the number of players. Surprises always counter Surprises in full, no matter what the function of the Surprises in question.

Back To Top

Q: Can a Surprise card be played to stop a card played previously during someone’s turn?

Some examples:

Example 1: Player A plays a Keeper, and then plays a Goal card to win. Player B plays That’s Mine (the counter-Keeper Surprise) to cancel Player A’s Keeper card hoping to cancel the win. Conversely, maybe Player A played a Goal, then a Keeper, and Player B tried to use Canceled Plans (the counter-Goal Surprise).

Example 2: Player A played the That’s Mine as an in-turn card and stole the Computer from Player B. Then Player A set down a Keeper. Player B then played a Surprise card, claiming that the wording on the card says it may be used on the Surprise card just played.

Example 3: Player A played Draw 3 Play 2 Of Them, drew three cards, and one of them is a Goal that let them win, so they played it. Player B then played Stop That (the counter-Action Surprise) to try to cancel the playing of Draw 3 Play 2, hoping to cancel the win.

A: In all of these cases, Player A’s actions stand, as the Surprise has been played too late. The counteractive Surprise must be played IMMEDIATELY after the card you wish to counteract. It also doesn’t apply to “the most recently played card of the target type played this turn.” Once another card of any type has been played, or a subsequent resulting action taken, it becomes too late to retroactively stop a previous card play with a Surprise.

Don’t be that person needing to ask for a special exception to the rules, and make sure the new players you’re teaching understand: Surprises need to be used in a timely manner. Whenever you have one in your hand, acquaint yourself with its power right away so that you can make a snap decision about whether to use it, since, if you hesitate too long, your opportunity is likely to pass.

So are there ever exceptions? It depends how relaxed you want to play, and how everyone is getting along. If Player B was a less-than-experienced player, it’s highly likely that it just took them a little while to read their own Surprise card to realize that it could be used in that way. If the results of a rewind are relatively inconsequential, one might cut them some slack. If Player A somehow anticipated that Player B was going to counter their play, and took their next action with barely a blink then that’s a bit rude. But if there was a heated disagreement, please do fall back on the official ruling. The ONLY reason you might choose to ignore it is if you wish to cut Player B some slack for being a n00b, or if you want to call shenanigans on Player A’s playing style for some reason.

Remember: it’s never appropriate to see the consequences of a previous card play, and THEN realize that you wish you’d stopped it before something else happened as a result of that play. In example 1, Player B probably didn’t realize that the first play would result in the win until the second card was played. In example 3, Player B couldn’t know when Draw 3 Play 2 was played that it would result in a win. Too bad. No exceptions for those cases.

This is where careful ordering of your plays and a good poker face are important so as not to broadcast your intentions. And people say there’s no strategy in Fluxx…

Back To Top

Q: If someone cancels one of my plays with a Surprise, do I get the card back, and still have that play to use?

… or does the card that was canceled go in the trash (or to my opponent in the case of That’s Mine), and my attempt has used up one of my plays?

See this answer in a video!
Little Answers

A: No, it’s that second thing you said: the card that got canceled goes away, and that play has been squandered. On the other hand, your opponent had to give up a card from their hand as well, so it’s not as though it’s without sacrifice on their part too.

Back To Top

Q: If a surprise card can cancel out other surprise cards can a 3rd (or even 4th) surprise card be played consecutively?
Q: With That’s Mine (That Be Mine, Twist Of Fate) played out of turn, if someone uses the Steal a Keeper card, will this Surprise card allow you to take the Keeper they have just stolen?

A: No. They didn’t actually play the Keeper card, they simply got possession of that Keeper by playing an Action. All you could do here would be to stop the Action itself using the Stop That! (Avast! Belay That! The Stars Are Wrong!) Surprise. Using that would not gain you the Keeper they were stealing. It would only stop them from stealing it.

Back To Top

Q: If I use the “during my turn” part of a surprise card on my turn, does that count as a play?
Q: Can one ever use the out-of-turn function of a Surprise during one’s own turn?

A: If you use the Surprise card as one of your plays during your turn, then you must use the “during your turn” functions. The “out of turn” functions almost always cancel some other card play, and it is not allowed to cancel your own play with your own Surprise. Thematically, consider this: it’s hard to really call it a “surprise” if you’re doing it to yourself in this manner.

The only time when you might not use the “during your turn” on your turn is when you’re using a Surprise to counter a Surprise played by another player against you during your turn.

See Does countering a Surprise on my turn count as…

Back To Top

Q: Can you use the out-of-turn option on Canceled Plans to nullify a goal you are forced to play during your turn that would cause someone else to win?

A: No. In general, you can’t use the out-of-turn portion of a Surprise during your turn, moreover the Canceled Plans card specifically says it is used to stop a Goal which another player has just played.

Back To Top

Q: With Canceled Plans played out of turn, does this card only discard a Goal that a player has just played or an existing goal on the table?

A: Only the Goal just played.

Back To Top

Q: Can Canceled Plans prevent someone from winning the game? What about That’s Mine!

Player #1 contends that he won the game because the rules say that as soon as a goal is achieved the game is over and no other actions/cards can be played. Player #2 says that no, the Surprise card overrides the general rule and cancels the playing of the goal and therefore the game does not end. Which is true?

A: Yes. If the Canceled Plans card played is played immediately, it cancels the Goal and play continues to the next person. That is the intent of the card.

It works the same way for That’s Mine. If the winning play is a Keeper, That’s Mine can be used to cancel that play, preventing the win.

Again, Surprises are meant to be able to work this way… but you have to be using the correct Surprise for the type of play you’re canceling – and you must play your Surprise in a timely manner: say, within a few seconds of the player playing their card.

For more nuanced suggestions about how to resolve some tweaky timing issues, check
Can a Surprise card be played to stop a card played previously during someone’s turn?”

Back To Top

Q: Does a counter-Surprise count as a Play for the person whose turn it is?

If I play a card on my turn and another player plays a Surprise to cancel it, then I play another Surprise to cancel the first one, since it’s my turn, does mounter Surprise count as a Play for me?

A: It does not count as a play. It’s sort of meta-out-of-turn.

Back To Top

Q: If someone plays a Rule to replace an existing Rule, but someone else plays a Veto, does the rule that would have been replaced remain in effect?

For example, Play 3 is in effect at the start of a turn, the current player plays Play 4, but another player plays Veto – what is the current play limit; 3, 4, or the default 1?

A: A: The newly played and Vetoed New Rule is canceled, so the old New Rule stays in play.

Back To Top

Q: Can I use a Surprise from my set-aside hand to cancel a Surprise played on one of my Draw 2 & Use Em, or Draw 3, Play 2 Actions?

Also, could I use a Surprise that was part of the subturn to cancel the attacking Surprise, and if so would that count as one of the plays?

Example:
Player #1 plays “Draw 3, Play 2 Of Them” and gets an Action, a Keeper, and a Surprise.
They play their Action and Player #2 plays Belay That [Avast, Stop That] to cancel it.
–> can Player #1 use the Surprise in their mini-hand to cancel that Surprise,
–> and if so do they still get to play their Keeper afterwards?

A: Yes, you can use a Surprise from your main hand, or from your sub-hand, to cancel another player’s Surprise during your Draw 3, Play 2 Action. Playing a Surprise to cancel a Surprise is a free action, so yes, you would get to play the third card if your second card is a Surprise that you use to counter a Surprise being used to stop your first card.

Back To Top

Q: If a player uses Trade Hands, and their hand contains Stop That (which cancels actions) can the other player use it immediately upon receipt to cancel the Trade Hands?

In this scenario Player #1 has the Trade Hands and Stop That, and Player #2 is being forced to trade hands.

A: No. If the surprise were in Player #2’s hand, then Player#2 could use it to stop the Action, but if the surprise is in Player #1’s hand, then Player #2 does not have access to the card until after the Trade Hands Action has been resolved, by which time it’s too late to be stopped.

If you think about it too hard, you’ll realize it can ONLY work this way. If it worked the way you described there would be a paradoxical loop:

You used the Stop That you received in Trade Hands to stop Trade Hands, so you didn’t trade hands, so you didn’t have the Stop That, so you couldn’t use it, so you traded hands, but then you had the Stop That, and you used it to prevent the Trade Hands, but then you didn’t have it, didn’t use it, but then you traded and had it…

…and so forth to insanity.

Back To Top

Q: Regarding Canceled Plans and Stop That, if you play them during your turn, it says “All other players must discard one Goal/Action, or a random card, from their hands.” Does that mean players get a choice?

Or must you discard a Goal/Action if you have one, and a random card only if you don’t?

A: Players get to choose. They can either select a random card from their hand to give up, or they may look at their cards and select a Goal/Action to give up.

Back To Top

Q: If I have specific Creepers required for a Goal, but I also have other Creepers, can I still win with that goal?

A: In the vast majority of cases, you cannot win if you have Creepers not specifically required by the goal.

Exceptions:
• Do your extraneous Creepers say that they keep you from winning? (Almost all Creepers do, but if they don’t then go for it.)
• Is there a Rule in play that lets you win even if you have Creepers? (There are a couple of these, depending on which versions you have.)
• In Batman Fluxx, if the Goal requires a Villain, Villains don’t prevent you from winning. However, if the Goal does NOT require a Villain, then Villains EVERYWHERE prevent you from winning.
• In Nature Fluxx (aka EcoFluxx) all Creepers prevent everyone from winning, regardless of who has them.

See also: The… Goal requires a Keeper and either of two Creepers…

Back To Top

Q: If Play All But 1 is in effect, and there’s something that requires me to increase my plays, do I end up playing all?

The Computer promo card, or Batcomputer in Batman Fluxx, for example, increases both your Play and your Draw by 1. Play 1 extra doesn’t affect Play All, so why would it affect Play All But 1?

A: Play All But 1 isn’t the same as Play All: when you Play All But 1, you do have 1 card remaining, so when you are then required to play +1 cards, you do have one left to play, so you must play it.

You need to take Play All But 1 as a unit into consideration: you can’t just break out the Play All, and apply the effects of the Computer, and then apply the …But 1 part.

Note that since the effects of the Computer are not optional, you have to do it, whether you like it or not. Other similar effects may be optional, so always check on that. It’s pretty easy to see whether something says you “may” do it, or if it just happens.

Back To Top

Q: For Actions that re/distribute Keepers and/or Creepers among the players, how are those dealt back out?

Do I get to decide who gets what? Do I get to decide how many to deal to each player? Do the recipients put them in their hands or on the table in front of them? Are they face up or face down? When I’m dealing them out, who do I start with?

A: First of all, only for Everybody Gets 1 (or Dreams & Omens) does the active player get to look at and decide who gets what. That’s a very different situation that the ones we’re talking about here. This question focuses on random (fairly even) redistribution along the lines of Share The Wealth.

The cards in question are shuffled or otherwise randomized so that the dealer does not know what’s being given out. They are then dealt out evenly, going around the circle clockwise, one card to each player in turn, continuing until the cards are all gone. Dealing starts with either the active player or the player to their left, with the intention of providing any possible benefit to the active player.

• So if it’s for Keepers, or a mixture of Keepers and Creepers, the active player should get the first card, because this is felt to be to their advantage, so they won’t get shorted if the number doesn’t deal out evenly. However, we would consider it an officially sanctioned house-rule if your group wanted to give the active player the option of starting with the player to their left instead of themselves. There could be reasons…

• For redistribution of Creepers-only, the card will usually say to start with the player to the left of the active player, because Creepers are generally considered a disadvantage, and this would mean that if anyone was going to receive fewer, it would always be the active player. However, as with other redistribution cards, your group may choose to let the active player decide whether they want to start with themselves or the person on their left. Again, we can think of reasons why someone might want to start distributing Creepers to themselves first.

Once dealt, all cards will be put into play immediately, so it’s OK to deal them out face up, but it’s sometimes better to deal them out face down, then have everybody reveal what they got all at once. As mentioned above, re/distributing by dealing will cause all players to end up with roughly equal numbers of cards. So if there are large discrepancies in the number of cards players had in play, this will even them out: players with a lot more than other players will end up with fewer than they had, and players with few or zero cards in play may end up with more. That’s the way it goes.

Here’s a list of redistributing cards, and their types:

Keepers only
Share the Wealth
Monster Mash
Run!!!
Keepers & Creepers
Mix It All Up
Zombie Jamboree
Crawling Chaos
Mass Hysteria
It’s a Cyclone!!!
Creepers only
Return of the Dead
Jailbreak/removal of Arkham Asylum rule

Scramble Keepers, which is only in early versions of “Basic” Fluxx (1.0-3.x) is the only Action which is different. While you still shuffle up the Keepers and hand them back randomly and they go back into play, you don’t deal them out evenly, but instead give each player the same number of Keepers they had before. When we came up with Share The Wealth, we felt it was far superior, as we liked the way it leveled the playing field, keeping the game more competitive, to maximize player engagement.

Back To Top

Q: If Inflation is played as one of the cards during the Action Draw 3 Play 2 Of Them, does it apply to the Action in progress?

A: Yes. Since everything happens instantly in Fluxx, Draw 3 Play 2 Of Them suddenly becomes Draw 4 Play 3 Of Them. The player should immediately draw an extra card and add it to the remainder of the cards being chosen from (the mini hand for the Action, not the set-aside main hand). It’s kind of like if you’d only drawn 2 cards instead of the 3 you were supposed to, realizing the mistake after playing one of them, and drawing the extra card you need at that point.

Of course, your regular hand will also need an extra card, since the Draw Rule itself has also incremented. You could do that at the time you’re executing your D3P2 by drawing a card and adding it to your set-aside hand, or you could catch up with that when you pick your regular hand back up again after the action. Note you’ll also have an extra Play to execute as well.

Adventure Time includes the Inflation analogue, Mathematical! Inflation is also available as a promo card to add to any Fluxx deck.

Math Fluxx includes a card called Increment All, which is similar to Inflation except it only affects Actions and New Rules.

Drinking Fluxx includes a card called Double Vision, which is similar to Inflation, but only changes 1 to 2, without affecting any higher numbers, so actually, it won’t affect Draw 3 Play 2, but it’s worth noting.

Back To Top

Q: Does the Rule Mystery Play require one to play the specific card flipped up from the top of the deck?

My friends think you can add it to you hand, and play some other card from their hand.

A: You are correct, your friends are incorrect. You pull the top card off the deck, and immediately play that card. You do not get to add it to your hand, or play any other card from your hand.

Analogues of Mystery Play include (some with slight variations such as conditional requirements for use):
Wormhole in Star Fluxx
Magic Shoes in Oz Fluxx
Egads! in Batman Fluxx
Open The Door in Monster Fluxx
Magic Portal in Adventure Time Fluxx
Chemical X in Cartoon Network Fluxx
Time Doorway in Regular Show Fluxx
Shiny! in Firefly Fluxx
Great Idea! in Stoner Fluxx

Back To Top

Q: Can I apply cards that work on Keepers to Creepers as well?

For example, in Monty Python Fluxx, if I play Steal a Keeper, am I allowed to steal a Creeper instead?
Does a Keeper Limit allow me to discard creepers?

A: Keeper means Keeper, not Creeper. That’s why we changed the wording on “Trash a Keeper” to “Trash Something” so that it could mean both. But for “Steal a Keeper” it’s still just Keepers. Same with Exchange Keepers. It only applies to Keepers.

(I wanted to name it “Trash a -eeper” but for some reason that didn’t fly.)

There is no limit to the number of Creepers you can have in front of you.

Back To Top

Q: If you draw a Creeper with Wormhole, you play it and then redraw. What if you draw yet another Creeper?

A: You keep drawing until you get a non-Creeper. Of course, this also applies to:

Analogues of Wormhole (found in Star Fluxx) include (some with slight variations such as conditional requirements for use):
Magic Shoes in Oz Fluxx
Egads! in Batman Fluxx
Magic Portal in Adventure Time Fluxx
Time Doorway in Regular Show Fluxx
Shiny! in Firefly Fluxx
Great Idea! in Stoner Fluxx

the following have a Wormhole analogue, but do not have Creepers naturally occurring in the deck:
Mystery Play in Fluxx 5.0 and SE
Open The Door in Monster Fluxx
Chemical X in Cartoon Network Fluxx

Back To Top